Pennsylvania Moves Forward

The Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts (CCAHA), which was represented at the Philadelphia forum, has been awarded $189,000 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to lead the Pennsylvania Cultural Resilience Network (PACRN), a two-year project to develop, coordinate, and consolidate statewide efforts to address disaster preparedness and response needs at museums and historic sites through new programs and resources. Components of the PACRN initiative include: emergency planning, response, and recovery training for museums and historic sites; the establishment of a trained response team to provide triage assistance when emergencies occur; expanded online emergency resources; and the development of an Annex concerning protocols at collecting institutions to be added to the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency’s statewide response and recovery plans. Click here for more information.

Another cool Pennsylvania initiative is Pennsylvania’s Top Ten Endangered Artifacts. This campaign highlights the cultural significance of our nation’s valuable and vulnerable heritage held in trust in Pennsylvania’s museums, libraries, archives, and historic sites. Check out the Top Ten here and vote for your favorite artifact (and even consider a financial contribution). Anyone can vote, whether or not you’re a Pennsylvanian.

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More Support for Your State Partnership

Heritage Preservation has been awarded an off-cycle grant by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to provide additional training and guidance to the 23 state heritage emergency partnerships that were launched at three forums this past spring. As part of the new grant, Heritage Preservation will host four two-hour webinars in 2014 on the following topics:

How an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Operates
Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning
Mitigation and the Mitigation Planning Process
Navigating Public Assistance Following a Disaster

We would love to draw from forum emergency managers to help us present these webinars; you are the experts, not us. If your area of expertise is in one of the above topics and you’re interested in sharing your knowledge, please let Lori Foley know. We’ll even pay you an honorarium.

And we’ll keep all of you posted as planning proceeds.

Enhanced Emergency Preparedness in Delaware

DDAT CERT Training

On July 10-11, 2013, a group of 34 representatives of museums, archives, libraries, and historical societies from across Delaware gathered at the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Museum in Dover to participate in an extensive, two-day Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training on all things emergency and disaster.  Training was provided by staff members and volunteers from the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and included such diverse topics as “Disaster Preparedness,” “Fire Safety,” “Seven Signs of Terrorism,” and “Light Search and Rescue.”

Participants left the training with vastly enhanced knowledge of how to be more effective in a disaster situation, whether they find themselves at their cultural heritage institution or at home when the event occurs.  All attendees received a “response backpack” loaded with personal protective equipment and tools needed to implement an effective response.

This event was sponsored by the Delaware Disaster Assistance Team (DDAT).  For more information regarding the event or DDAT, please contact Pat Young at pyoung@udel.edu.

Full Steam Ahead in Maine

Delegates from Maine have been hard at work following our April forum in Philadelphia. Participant Dwane Hubert of the Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) was able to allocate $45,000 of MEMA’s Homeland Security funds to a grant to the Maine State Museum for cultural disaster preparedness.  The grant will enable the Museum to hire a part-time coordinator who will create training and disseminate information about disaster preparedness to both cultural institutions and emergency responders. Funding will also cover the development of a website, purchase of supplies, and a few training sessions across the state.

A steering committee, consisting of representatives from the Maine State Museum, Maine State Library, Maine State Archives, Maine Historic Preservation Commission, Maine Emergency Management Agency, two conservators who serve on the AIC-CERT team, and the head librarian from Scarborough, ME, had actually met once, agreeing to lay the foundation for Maine’s cultural heritage emergency network with no funding in hand. Then Dwane and MEMA came through with the grant. The committee is called the “Cultural Emergency Response Coalition” or CERC – Maine.

Kate McBrien, Curator of Historic Collections at the Maine State Museum, said the April forum “was just the catalyst we needed to start a program in Maine.” We are delighted to oblige! For more information, contact Kate at Katherine.McBrien@maine.gov.